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Phyciodes
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May be controversial but I dont think he deserved a religious funeral. I feel his soul was too evil to be deserve the comfort of a religious ceremony.I also wish they'd burned his body, I don't feel comfortable knowing he's still... all in one piece. Like the want to shoot a dead person, just to make sure they're dead, even though they're laying in a pool of their own blood and not breathing (as seen in films )...

I think the US Military would of got more backlash if they did that, by giving him a proper religious funeral I think many of the people within the extremist groups will see America is sensitive to the Islamic Culture and their ways of doing things, just will not tolerate people who are terrorists. I fully agree in the sense he should of been hung, drawn and quartered. However, this is the way to get people within the organisation to see the US' compassion with the Islamic faith and hopefully make them see that they're not against Islam.
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I think the US Military would of got more backlash if they did that, by giving him a proper religious funeral I think many of the people within the extremist groups will see America is sensitive to the Islamic Culture and their ways of doing things, just will not tolerate people who are terrorists. I fully agree in the sense he should of been hung, drawn and quartered. However, this is the way to get people within the organisation to see the US' compassion with the Islamic faith and hopefully make them see that they're not against Islam.

Nah, I understand the reasoning etc. but he just didnt derserve it. Very intelligent post though :rolleyes:
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Why? If anything, this going to kick up a big fuss, probably even more so with the Americans going "so proud to be an American!!!!!!"

Why not? :blush: The git responsible for killing their loved ones is now dead, JUSTICE!Why would it kick up a fuss? :rolleyes:
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Why would it kick up a fuss? :rolleyes:

Retaliation from terrorists... Hence causing more death and destruction...It's hard to feel like this has ended just with one person's death... Osama was indeed the face of Al-Queda but it takes more than one man to run such an organisation...
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Is it wrong that I'm apathetic to all this?He's dead. A big figure head in terrorism is dead. All well and good. But there's still a threat, no? With the Olympics around the corner, I'd expect there to be a high terror threat here whether he's alive or dead. There's still going to be war, there's still going to be terror and so on.One man has died, it's a step in the right direction, but it's not going to change that much in my eyes.

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I don't think there is any doubts that there will be retaliation attempts from Al Quaeda, but to have such a high profile figure from the organisation taken down is one step towards bringing the organisation down. He was the principal architect in the 9/11 attacks and now we have his sick mind blown to bits we can now concentrate on taking the rest of the organisation down.

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Clearly it is a massive achievement, and it does really symbolise everything we've been trying to do for the past 10 years, and so in that respect his death is something to celebrate. However, it's certainly true that you can't kill an idea, and there are many, many more just waiting to fill his shoes. I get the feeling the coming months will be the most dangerous for Western citizens on their own soil for some time, and I feel the threat to Britain is just as great as that to America. Like I say though, the very message of defiance and perseverance is unmistakable, so I am very pleased he is dead.One other thing worth considering is the money - the fact that he put significant capital into financing al Qaeda could make his death more significant than the pure symbolism of it.

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I agree with the point Josh has made, this will be milked for propaganda, however much of a real effect it actually had is up for debate.Bin Laden is not stupid, after all he's evaded capture for a decade as perhaps the world's most wanted man and has masterminded horrific, harrowing events which have not been thwarted, as many terror attacks have been. Therefore I think he would have been expecting the be captured/killed by the US, it was only a matter of time really considering the resources behind the effort and what a morale boost it would be for the USA, as shown by the scene in Washington and New York. This decade may have been used to ready the next in line, it's ideal really. Would it not be useful ( as the enemy) to have resources channelled into finding someone who perhaps is not particularly active anymore? Moving the focus from perhaps the next in line who could arguably be a bigger blow to Al-Qaeda.As many have stated, it does send out a powerful message.

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http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/americas/cheerleader-must-compensate-school-that-told-her-to-clap-rapist-2278522.htmlCheerleader must compensate school that told her to clap the name of a 'rapist'The cheerleader refused to chant the name of Rakheem Bolton

A teenage girl who was dropped from her high school's cheerleading squad after refusing to chant the name of a basketball player who had sexually assaulted her must pay compensation of $45,000 (£27,300) after losing a legal challenge against the decision.The United States Supreme Court on Monday declined to hear a review of the case brought by the woman, who is known only as HS. Lower courts had ruled that she was speaking for the school, rather than for herself, when serving on a cheerleading squad – meaning that she had no right to stay silent when coaches told her to applaud.She was 16 when she said she had been raped at a house party attended by dozens of fellow students from Silsbee High School, in south-east Texas. One of her alleged assailants, a student athlete called Rakheem Bolton, was arrested, with two other young men.In court, Bolton pleaded guilty to the misdemeanour assault of HS. He received two years of probation, community service, a fine and was required to take anger-management classes. The charge of rape was dropped, leaving him free to return to school and take up his place on the basketball team.Four months later, in January 2009, HS travelled to one of Silsbee High School's basketball games in Huntsville. She joined in with the business of leading cheers throughout the match. But when Bolton was about to take a free throw, the girl decided to stand silently with her arms folded."I didn't want to have to say his name and I didn't want to cheer for him," she later told reporters. "I just didn't want to encourage anything he was doing."Richard Bain, the school superintendent in the sport-obsessed small town, saw things differently. He told HS to leave the gymnasium. Outside, he told her she was required to cheer for Bolton. When the girl said she was unwilling to endorse a man who had sexually assaulted her, she was expelled from the cheerleading squad.The subsequent legal challenge against Mr Bain's decision perhaps highlights the seriousness with which Texans take cheerleading and high school sports, which can attract crowds in the tens of thousands.HS and her parents instructed lawyers to pursue a compensation claim against the principal and the School District in early 2009. Their lawsuit argued that HS's right to exercise free expression had been violated when she was instructed to applaud her attacker. But two separate courts ruled against her, deciding that a cheerleader freely agrees to act as a "mouthpiece" for a institution and therefore surrenders her constitutional right to free speech. In September last year, a federal appeals court upheld those decisions and announced that HS must also reimburse the school sistrict $45,000, for filing a "frivolous" lawsuit against it."As a cheerleader, HS served as a mouthpiece through which [the school district] could disseminate speech – namely, support for its athletic teams," the appeals court decision says. "This act constituted substantial interference with the work of the school because, as a cheerleader, HS was at the basketball game for the purpose of cheering, a position she undertook voluntarily."The family's lawyer said the ruling meanst that students exercising their right of free speech can end up punished for refusing to follow "insensitive and unreasonable directions".

Absolutely disgusting. I can't believe that this is going through if true.
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It's disgusting isn't it? Their Christianity has made them believe that having romantic feelings for a member of the same sex is the worst thing imaginable but they have no problem in destroying the life of another human- being.Though I could say that religion has already destroyed their lives.I suppose it's one saving grace, but if you read the whole article it does imply that perhaps it's just been postponed and there's nothing to say it wouldn't be re-addressed.It's horror stories like this that make me thankful for not belonging to any religion. What ignorance.

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Just going back a bit, for those saying the death of Osama will cause retaliation... well considering future attacks were already being planned it's not so much retaliation, it's more the inevitable consequences of religious extremists believing the Western world is evil.It will bring closure to some people but it won't be the end of things.

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Just going back a bit, for those saying the death of Osama will cause retaliation... well considering future attacks were already being planned it's not so much retaliation, it's more the inevitable consequences of religious extremists believing the Western world is evil.It will bring closure to some people but it won't be the end of things.

The pakistani taliban launched an attack today and said it was done in retaliation to the death of Osama Bin Laden :)
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I thought that was just there excuse :)

Tbh I doubt it's their 'excuse' since it's not like they can just go, well you killed Osama and the authorities would just turn around and be like, OH OKAY THEN THAT'S ALRIGHT. It was the first attack since Osama died, and obviously there was going to be retaliation, and they didn't just attack them for the lols..
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  • 1 month later...

Surely no one has missed the news recently... yes the news is the news. As is described by the New York Times

In truth, a kind of British Spring is under way, now that the News Corporation’s tidy system of punishment and reward has crumbled. Members of Parliament, no longer fearful of retribution in Mr. Murdoch’s tabloids, are speaking their minds and giving voice to the anger of their constituents. Meanwhile, social media has roamed wild and free across the story, punching a hole in the tiny clubhouse that had been running the country. Democracy, aided by sunlight, has broken out in Britain.

Love it. :)
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  • 2 weeks later...

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